Stewart Breckenridge Line In America

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ashland1000I have been befriended by Hollis’ two sisters on Facebook, Rossetta and Elizabeth. Here is their heritage as well, via their half-brother, Hollis Lee Williams, who always exhibited good breeding under the gravest circumstances. Here are the thoroughbred horse breeders of Kentucky, and the founders of the Republican Party – as well as the flower of the Confederacy.

Below is a video of my mother, Rosemary Rosamond, riding a horse and shooting a pistol. Her mother chased Errol Flynn and his friend out of the house when they showed up drunk early one morning and serenaded the four Rosamond sisters. Rosemary was a cousin to the actress, Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor, who is in the peerage.

Jon Presco

http://www.thepeerage.com/p33432.htm

http://www.geni.com/people/Hon-Mary-Stewart-Coote/6000000004018367453

http://www.geni.com/people/Sir-Alexander-Stewart-2nd-Baronet-Stewart-of-Ramalton/6000000003266341220

Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt.[1]
M, #330678,
d. 3 September 1650
Last Edited=19 Jan 2009
Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt. married Catherine Newcomen, daughter of Sir Robert Newcomen, 4th Bt. and Anne Boleyn.[1]
He died on 3 September 1650, killed in action.[1]
He was the son of Sir William Stewart, 1st Bt.[1]
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baronet Stewart, of Ramalton, co. Donegal [I., 1623].
He fought in the Battle of Dunbar on 3 September 1650.[1]
Child of Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt. and Catherine Newcomen
1. William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy+1

he Battle of Dunbar (3 September 1650) was a battle of the Third English Civil War. The English Parliamentarian forces under Oliver Cromwell defeated a Scottish army commanded by David Leslie which was loyal to King Charles II, who had been proclaimed King of Scots on 5 February 1649. The battlefield has been inventoried and protected by Historic Scotland under the Historic Environment (Amendment) Act 2011.[4]

http://www.historynet.com/scottish-civil-war-battle-of-dunbar.htm


According to an anonymous Scottish chronicler, Sir John Haldane of Gleneggies’ regiment also’stood very stiffly to it’ and ‘would not yield though at the push of pike and butt-end of musket, until a troop of horse charged from one end to another of them, and so left them to the mercy of the foot.’ All its senior officers were killed. Another Scottish chronicler, who had apparently interviewed some of Cromwell’s troops after the battle, wrote that Gleneggies’ and Alexander Stewart’s two ‘regiments of foot fought it out manfully, for they were all killed as they stood (as the enemy confessed).’ Nevertheless, by the time the sun had evaporated the morning mists, Cromwell had shattered Leslie’s army.

http://www.jesus-is-lord.com/kjchart.htm

http://www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/windsor_6.htm

The Spencers were an established landed family who descended from the great John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough and from King Charles II. Diana had no less than four descents from Charles II, through his illegitimate offspring. These include James Scott, Duke of Monmouth, Charles’ eldest son by his mistress Lucy Walter, in a bid for the crown, Monmouth led a rebellion against his uncle James II, and was later executed, Henry Fitzroy, Charles’ son by Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland, Charles Beauclerk, the king’s son by his most famous mistress, the actress Nell Gwyn and Charles Lennox, his son by his French mistress, Louise de Kerouaille.

http://www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/stuart_3.htm

The eldest surviving son of Charles I and Henrietta Maria of France, daughter of Henry IV of France, the future Charles II was born on 29th May, 1630, at St. James Palace, London, the second child of the marriage, he replaced an elder brother, Charles James, who had died shortly after birth. Charles was a large, dark, but clearly healthy baby.
Civil War broke out between his father and Parliament in 1642, causing Charles mother, Henrietta Maria and his younger siblings to be sent to the safety of her native France. Prince Charles and his younger brother, James, Duke of York, remained with their father durng the early stages of the Civil War. He first saw action at the Battle of Edgehill, but following the defeat at Marston Moor in 1644, was sent to Bristol, there he was placed in command of the West Country.

The House of Stewart, or Stuart, is a European royal house. Founded by Robert II of Scotland, the Stewarts first became monarchs of the Kingdom of Scotland during the late 14th century, and subsequently held the position of the Kings of England, Ireland, and Great Britain. Their patrilineal ancestors (from Brittany) had held the office of High Steward of Scotland since the 12th century, after arriving by way of Norman England. The dynasty inherited further territory by the 17th century which covered the entire British Isles, including the Kingdom of England and Kingdom of Ireland, also maintaining a claim to the Kingdom of France.
In total, nine Stewart monarchs ruled just Scotland from 1371 until 1603. After this there was a Union of the Crowns under James VI & I who had become the senior genealogical claimant to The Crown holdings of the extinct House of Tudor. Thus there were six Stewart monarchs who ruled both England and Scotland as well as Ireland (although the later Stuart era was interrupted by an interregnum lasting from 1649–1660, as a result of the Wars of the Three Kingdoms). Additionally, at the foundation of the Kingdom of Great Britain after the Acts of Union, which politically united England and Scotland, the first monarch was Anne, Queen of Great Britain. After her death, all the holdings passed to the House of Hanover, under the terms of the Act of Settlement 1701.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashland_(Henry_Clay_estate)

Ashland is the name of the plantation of the 19th-century Kentucky statesman Henry Clay,[2] located in Lexington, Kentucky, in the central Bluegrass region of the state. It is a registered National Historic Landmark.[2]
The Ashland Stakes, a Thoroughbred horse race at Keeneland Race Course that has run annually since the race course first opened in 1936, was named for the historically important estate.

http://www.oocities.org/wlabach/hclay.htm

Beatrice Mills, OBE (1883 – 30 January 1972) was an American-born heiress. The daughter of the very wealthy Ogden Mills, she was a twin to Gladys, and brother to Ogden. In 1909, she married Bernard Forbes, 8th Earl of Granard with whom she had four children. Daughter Moira married Count Rossi of Switzerland and Eileen married the 5th Marquess of Bute.
With her marriage, Beatrice Mills would be known as Countess and/or Lady Granard. Her husband’s wealth was limited and she provided the funds to finish restoring the family’s historic Castleforbes in Newtownforbes, County Longford, Ireland. Their principal residence was at Forbes House, Halkin Street, SW1 in London plus a residence at 73 Rue de Varenne, Paris, France she would inherit from her father.
In 1920, Beatrice Mills Forbes was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire. [1]
[edit] Thoroughbred racing
Beatrice Mills was raised around horses at her family’s Livingston Mansion in Staatsburg, New York. Her father owned Thoroughbred racehorses in the United States and in France in partnership with Lord Derby. Beatrice’s sister Gladys and her brother Ogden would establish Wheatley Stable that would become one of the preeminent Thoroughbred racing and breeding operations in the United States.
Beatrice’s husband, Bernard, was Master of the Horse whose duties for King George V included overseer of the Royal Stables and Stud. On January 29, 1929, Beatrice’s father died. As part of her inheritance she received his stable of Thoroughbreds in France. That year, she led all owners in purses earned. [1] In 1933, her horse, Cappiello, won the Prix Lupin and the prestigious Grand Prix de Paris at Longchamp Racecourse in Paris. [2] Among her other racing successes, Lady Granard’s horses won the Prix Jacques le Marois in 1937 and 1967. In 1964 her horse Pourparler won the British Classic, the 1,000 Guineas Stakes.
The most notable horse bred and raced by her siblings Wheatley Stable in the United States was Bold Ruler, a U.S. Racing Hall of Fame inductee and an eight-time Leading sire in North America. Gladys and Ogden bred Bold Ruler to the Champion racing mare, Misty Morn. The result of the mating was Bold Lad, a colt born in 1962 that earned American Champion Two-Year-Old Colt honors. Bold Ruler sired a second colt in 1964 by a different mare that was given the same Bold Lad name. Bold Lad II was bred by Lady Granard and raced in England and Ireland where it too won Champion Two-Year-Old Colt honors. [3]
A widow for more than twenty-three years, Lady Granard died at her Paris residence in 1972.

Robert Breckenridge was born circa 1720 at Ireland.1 He was the son of Alexander Breckenridge and Jane Preston.1 He married, secondly, Letitia Preston, daughter of Colonel John Preston and Elizabeth Patton, on 6 July 1758 at Augusta County, Virginia, U.S.A.. He died after 16 August 1772 at Fincastle, Botetourt County, Virginia, U.S.A..1
He emigrated with his parents to North America arriving on 1728.1 He held the office of Sheriff of Augusta County, Virginia in 1755.1 He fought in the Big Sandy expedition against the Indians in March 1756.1 He was commander of the company of soldiers attached to the First Virginia Regiment in March 1756.1 He held the office of Justice of the Peace (J.P.) for Botetourt County, Virginia.1 His last will was dated 16 August 1772.1

Children of Robert Breckenridge and Letitia Preston
1.Robert Breckinridge1
2.Hon. John Breckinridge+1 b. 2 Dec 1760, d. 14 Dec 1806

Citations
1.[S1425] Gloria Hursey, “re: Breckinridge Family,” e-mail message to James Baring, 15 August 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Breckinridge Family.”

Alexander Breckenridge1

M, #153122, b. 1686, d. before 23 September 1743

Last Edited=1 Nov 2006
Alexander Breckenridge was born in 1686 at Ireland.1 He married Jane Preston, daughter of Phineas Preston and Hon. Mary Stewart.1 He died before 23 September 1743 at Tinkling Springs, Fisherville, Augusta County, Virginia, U.S.A..1 He was buried at Tinkling Springs Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Fisherville, Augusta County, Virginia, U.S.A..1 His will was probated on 24 May 1750.1
He and Jane Preston emigrated along with their children to North America arriving on 1728.1

Children of Alexander Breckenridge and Jane Preston
1.Letitia Breckenridge1
2.John Breckenridge1 b. b 1720
3.George Breckenridge1 b. b 1720
4.Robert Breckenridge+1 b. c 1720, d. a 16 Aug 1772
5.James Breckenridge1 b. b 1740
6.Adam Breckenridge1 b. b 1740
7.Smith Breckenridge1 b. b 1740

Wheatley Stable was the nom de course for the thoroughbred horse racing partnership formed by Gladys Mills Phipps and her brother, Ogden L. Mills. The horses were raised at Claiborne Farm near Paris, Kentucky.

[edit] History

Over the years, Hall of Fame horse trainers Sunny Jim Fitzsimmons, Bill Winfrey and Eddie Neloy conditioned their horses. In February 1926, the stable recorded its first win and that year purchased the yearlings Diavolo and Dice from breeder Harry Payne Whitney. In 1927 Dice won four important stakes races but died unexpectedly. Nevertheless, his performance earned Wheatley Stable its first racing award when he was voted U.S. Champion 2-Year-Old Colt. Diavolo developed more slowly but in 1929 won as U.S. Champion Handicap Male Horse.

In 1928 Wheatley Stable horses debuted in the U.S. Triple Crown races. Between then and 1966 the stable entered seven Kentucky Derbys, seven Preakness Stakes, and eleven Belmont Stakes. They won the 1957 Preakness Stakes with Bold Ruler.

As part of a program honoring important horse racing tracks and racing stables, the Pennsylvania Railroad named its baggage car #5854 the “Wheatley Stable”.

The Wheatley Stable bred and raised its horses at Claiborne Farm near Paris, Kentucky. Famously, in 1933 Wheatley Stable bred Seabiscuit but sold him early in his three-year-old season. They also bred Bold Bidder, U.S. Champion Handicap Male Horse for 1966 and the sire of Hall of Fame colt Spectacular Bid. Wheatley Stable bred and raced seven Champions of their own:
Misty Morn – U.S. Champion 3-Year-Old Filly (1955), U.S. Champion Handicap Female Horse (1955), Broodmare of the Year (1963)
High Voltage – U.S. Champion 2-Year-Old Filly (1964)
Bold Ruler – U.S. 3-Yr-Old Champion Male (1957), U.S. Horse of the Year (1957), U.S. Champion Sprint Horse (1958), U.S. Racing Hall of Fame (1973)
Castle Forbes – U.S. Champion 2-Year-Old Filly (1963)
Bold Lad – U.S. Champion 2-year-old Colt (1964)
Bold Lad II – multiple stakes winner in England.
Successor – U.S. Champion 2-Year-Old Colt (1966)
Queen Empress – U.S. Champion 2-Year-Old Filly (1964)

Some of Wheatley Stable’s Grade I wins include:
Acorn Stakes : Hostility (1939), High Voltage (1955), Irish Jay (1960), Castle Forbes (1964)
Alabama Stakes : Nixie (1928), High Bid (1959)
Brooklyn Handicap : Blenheim (1932), Dark Secret (1933)
Carter Handicap : Bold Ruler (1958)
Champagne Stakes : Bold Lad (1964), Successor (1966)
Coaching Club American Oaks : Edelweiss (1933), High Voltage (1955)
Derby Trial : Bold Lad (1965)
Diana Handicap : Misty Morn (1955)
Flamingo Stakes : Bold Ruler (1957)
Frizette Stakes : Queen Empress (1964)
Futurity Stakes Bold Ruler (1956)
Hopeful Stakes : Bold Lad (1964), What A Pleasure (1967), Irish Castle (1969)
Jockey Club Gold Cup : Diavolo (1929), Dark Secret (1933 & 1934)
Lawrence Realization : Carry Over (1934)
Manhattan Handicap : Dark Secret (1933 & 1934)
Metropolitan Handicap : Snark (1937), Bold Lad (1966)
Molly Pitcher Handicap : Misty Morn (1955), Discipline (1966)
Monmouth Handicap : Bold Ruler (1955)
Monmouth Oaks : Misty Morn (1958)
Preakness Stakes : Bold Ruler (1957)
Spinaway Stakes : Merry Lassie (1937), Irish Jay (1959)
Suburban Handicap : Snark (1938), Bold Ruler (1958)
Test Stakes : Nixie (1928), Bold Consort (1963), Discipline (1965)
Tremont Stakes : Diavolo (1927), Hilarious (1952), Quick Lunch (1953), Bold Lad (1964), Successor (1966)
Wood Memorial Stakes : Distraction (1928), Teufel (1936), Melodist (1937), Bold Ruler (1957)
Whitney Handicap : Stupendous (1967)

Mary Stewart. She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.1,2 From 1692, her married name became Preston.2 From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston
Jane Preston+2 b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
Mary Preston2 b. 1696, d. 1749
Colonel John Preston+2 b. 1699, d. 1747

Alexander Breckenridge was born in 1686 at Ireland.1 He married Jane Preston, daughter of Phineas Preston and Hon. Mary Stewart.1 He died before 23 September 1743 at Tinkling Springs, Fisherville, Augusta County, Virginia, U.S.A..1 He was buried at Tinkling Springs Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Fisherville, Augusta County, Virginia, U.S.A..1 His will was probated on 24 May 1750.1
He and Jane Preston emigrated along with their children to North America arriving on 1728.1
Children of Alexander Breckenridge and Jane Preston
1.Letitia Breckenridge1
2.John Breckenridge1 b. b 1720
3.George Breckenridge1 b. b 1720
4.Robert Breckenridge+1 b. c 1720, d. a 16 Aug 1772
5.James Breckenridge1 b. b 1740
6.Adam Breckenridge1 b. b 1740
7.Smith Breckenridge1 b. b 1740

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breckinridge_family

The Breckinridge family is a family of public figures from the United States. The family has included six members of the United States House of Representatives, two United States Senators, a cabinet member, two Ambassadors, a Vice President of United States and an unsuccessful Presidential candidate. Breckinridges have served as college presidents, prominent ministers, soldiers, theologians and in important positions at state and local levels. The family was most notable in the State of Kentucky and most prominent during the 19th century, during nearly one-third of which a member of the family served in the Congress of the United States. Below is a list of members.
Alexander Breckenridge (1686–1743), First Breckenridge in New World, emigrated to Philadelphia PA c. 1728. Married to Jane Preston in 1695 in County Londonderry, Ireland. She was sister of Robert Preston, first Speaker of Kentucky State House of Representatives .
Robert Breckenridge, Sr. (1720–1773), here termed Colonel Robert Breckenridge, Captain in Virginia militia during the French and Indian War and officer in the Revolutionary Army.[dubious – discuss] Son of Alexander Breckenridge I. Married first Sarah Poage. After his first wife’s death Breckenridge married second, his first cousin Letitia Preston.[1]
Alexander Breckenridge, son of Robert Breckenridge and Sarah Poage, here termed Captain Alexander Breckenridge. Married wealthy widow Jane Buchanan Floyd whose son John Floyd was Governor of Virginia.[1]
James Douglas Breckinridge, son of Captain Alexander Breckenridge (d. 1849), member of Kentucky House of Representatives (1809–11) and the U.S. House of Representatives (1821–23).[1]
Robert Breckenridge (1754–1833), son of Col. Robert Breckenridge and Sarah Poage, Revolutionary War General. Ratifier of the U.S. Constitution. Kentucky State Representative 1792–1795. Speaker of the Kentucky House of Representatives. Brother of Captain Alexander Breckenridge; half-brother of John Breckinridge and James Breckinridge. Robert Breckenridge never married. Nota Bene: During his lifetime Colonel Robert Breckenridge spelled his surname as shown here, as did his father Alexander Breckenridge I. His sons by Leticia Preston, (i.e. James and John) began spelling the family name ‘Breckinridge’.[2]
James Breckinridge (1763–1833), Virginia House Delegate 1789–1802 1806–1808 1819–1821 1823–1824, member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Virginia 1809–1817. Brother of John Breckinridge, Son of Robert Breckinridge and Letitia Preston.[3]
John Breckinridge (1760–1806), Member of House of Burgesses, U.S. District Attorney of Kentucky 1793–1794, Attorney General of Kentucky 1793–1797, Kentucky State Representative 1788–1790 1799–1801, delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1799, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1801–1805, Attorney General of the United States under Jefferson 1805–1806. Married Mary Hopkins Cabell in 1785. Half-brother of Alexander and Robert Breckenridge, brother of James Breckinridge, Son of Colonel Robert Breckinridge and Letitia Preston.[4]
Letitia Breckinridge, Daughter of John Breckinridge. Married first to Alfred William Grayson in 1804. Graduate of Cambridge University, lawyer, son of Senator William Grayson of Virginia. Died in 1810. Married second to Peter B. Porter (1773–1844), New York Assemblyman 1802 and 1828, U.S. Representative from New York 1809–1813 and 1815–1816, New York Secretary of State 1815–1816, U.S. Secretary of War 1828–1829.[5]
General John Breckinridge Grayson (1806–1862) Born at Cabell’s Dale, Fayette County, Kentucky. Son of Letitia Preston Breckinridge and Alfred William Grayson. Graduated West Point Military Academy, 1826. Lieutenant Colonel U.S. Army at outbreak of Civil War, resigned in 1861, enterest C.S.A. and commissioned Brigadier General. Died while in command of the coastal defenses of Georgia and Florida, in Tallahassee 1862.[6]
Colonel Peter A. Porter (1827–1864), New York Assemblyman 1861–62, Colonel of the 129th New York State Volunteers, killed in action, 1864, Only son of Peter Buell Porter. Married cousin Mary Cabell Breckinridge in 1852.
Peter A. Porter (1853–1925), member of the New York Legislature, U.S. Representative from New York 1907–1909. Son of Peter Augustus Porter and Mary Cabell Breckinridge, Grandson of Peter Buell Porter.[7]
Joseph “Cabell” Breckinridge I (1788–1823), Major in War of 1812. Kentucky State Representative 1817–1818, Speaker of the Kentucky House of Representatives. Kentucky Secretary of State 1820–1823. Married Mary Clay Smith, daughter of Samuel Stanhope Smith, President of Princeton University. Son of John Breckinridge.[8]
John Cabell Breckinridge (1821–1875) Member Kentucky House of Representatives 1849–51. U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1851–55. Delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1856. Vice President of the United States 1857–61. Candidate for President of the United States 1860. United States Senator from Kentucky 1861. Confederate States Secretary of War 1865. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge I.[9]
Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, II (1844–1906) Major in the C.S.A. Married Sallie Frances Johnson, daughter of Robert Ward Johnson in 1869. Son of Hon. John Cabell Breckinridge.[10]
John Cabell Breckinridge, II (1870–1941) Prominent New York attorney. Married to Isabella Goodrich (1874–1961), daughter of B.F. Goodrich. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge. Grandson of John Cabell Breckinridge.[11]
Mary Marvin Breckinridge (1905–2002), Photojournalist, cinematographer, and philanthropist. Daughter of John Cabell Breckinridge, II and Isabella Goodrich. Great-granddaughter or John Cabell Breckinridge and granddaughter of B.F. Goodrich.
Clifton Rhodes Breckinridge (1846–1932), U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1883–1889 1890–1895, U.S. Minister to Russia 1894–1897, delegate to the Arkansas Constitutional Convention 1917. Married Katherine Breckinridge Carson in 1876. Son of Hon. John Cabell Breckinridge.[12]
James Carson Breckinridge (1877–1942) Lieutenant General, USMC, Married Dorothy Throckmorton Thompson, 1922. Son of Clifton Rhodes Breckinridge.[13]
Mary Breckinridge (1881–1965), Founder of the Frontier Nursing Service. Married Richard Thompson. Daughter of Clifton Rhodes Breckinridge, sister of James Carson Breckinridge.
John Witherspoon Owen Breckinridge (1850–1892) Member of California State Assembly 1884–85. Son of Hon. John Cabell Breckinridge. Married to Louise Tevis, daughter of Lloyd Tevis, First President of Wells Fargo Bank.[14]
John Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. (1879–1914) Prominent San Francisco businessman. Son of John Witherspoon Owen Breckinridge. Married Adelaide Murphy, daughter of Samuel Green Murphy, President of the First National Bank of San Francisco, California.[15]
John Cabell “Bunny” Breckinridge, Jr. (1903–1996) Actor and drag queen. Son of John Cabell Breckinridge, Sr.[15]
Rev. John Breckinridge, D. D. (1797–1841) Born at Cabell’s Dale, son of John Breckinridge. Presbyterian Minister. Graduated Princeton College 1818, Princeton Theological Seminary 1821. Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives. Married in 1823 Margaret, daughter of Rev. Samuel Miller D. D.[6]
Mary Cabell Breckinridge (1826–1854) Married cousin Colonel Peter A. Porter in 1852. Daughter of Rev. John Breckinridge.
Samuel Miller Breckinridge (1828–1891) Member of Missouri legislature 1854–1855. Became Circuit Court judge in 1859. Elder in the Presbyterian Church and a leading member of its General Assembly. Married Virginia Harrison Castleman. Son of Rev. John Breckinridge.[16]
Margaret Miller Breckinridge (1851–1919) Married St. Louis, Missouri businessman William Strudwick Long. Daughter of Samuel Miller Breckinridge.[17]
Samuel Miller Breckinridge Long (1881–1958) lawyer and diplomat. Graduated Princeton in 1904. Advisor to Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. U.S. Ambassador to Italy 1933–36. U.S. delegate to Dumbarton Oaks Conference. Son of Margaret Miller Breckinridge and William Strudwick Long.[18]
Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800–1871), Kentucky State Representative 1825–1828, Kentucky Superintendent of Public Instruction 1849–1853, candidate for delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1849. Son of John Breckinridge. Married Ann Sophonisba Preston in 1823.[19]
Mary Cabell Breckinridge, (born 1828) Daughter of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge. Married to William Warfield.
Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (1851–1921), Presbyterian theologian, principal of Princeton Theological Seminary. Son of Mary Cabell Breckinridge and William Warfield.[6]
Ethelbert Dudley Warfield (1861–1936) Graduate of Princeton, Oxford, and Columbia Law School. President of Miami University and Lafayette College, author, Director of Princeton Theological Seminary. Son of Mary Cabell Breckinridge and William Warfield.[6]
Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. (1834–1915), Confederate States Representative from Kentucky 1862–1865, Colonel in the Confederate States Army, Kentucky Common Pleas Court Judge 1876. Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge. Married Katharine Morrison in 1856.[20]
Marie Lettice Preston Breckinridge (born 1836), married Rev. William Collins Handy in 1857.
L. Irving Handy (1861–1922), U.S. Representative from Delaware 1897–1899, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1904. Son of Marie Lettice Preston Breckinridge and Rev. William Collins Handy. Nephew of William Campbell Preston Breckinridge.[21]
William Campbell Preston Breckinridge (1837–1904), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1876, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1885–1895. Married Lucretia Hart Clay, granddaughter of Henry Clay. Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge.[22]
Desha Breckinridge (1867–1935), editor and publisher of the Lexington Herald. Married Madeline McDowell Breckinridge, great-granddaughter of Henry Clay in 1898. Son of W.C.P. Breckinridge. Brother of Sophonisba Breckinridge.
Sophonisba Preston Breckinridge (1886–1948), Lawyer, Activist involved in Women’s rights, Civil Rights, Labor, and Pacifist movements; namesake of Breckinridge House, a dormitory of the University of Chicago. Daughter of W.C.P. Breckinridge. Sister of Desha Breckinridge.
Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. (1842–1921), General in the U.S. Army. Married Louise Ludlow Dudley, daughter of Ethelbert Ludlow Dudley, 1868. Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge.[23]
Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Jr. (1872–1898), U.S. Naval officer, drowned. Namesake of USS Breckinridge. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr.[24]
Ethelbert Ludlow Dudley Breckinridge (1875–1914) Graduated Princeton 1898, Captain in U.S. Army, wounded in the Philippine-American War. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. Married Genevieve Pearson Mattingly (1878–1957).[25]
William Mattingly Breckinridge (1905–1996) Major General, U.S. Army. Chief of the U.S. Army Security Agency. Married Frances Naylor. Son of Ethelbert Ludlow Dudley Breckinridge.[26]
Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Sr. (1882–1941) Physician in Lexington, Kentucky, author, U.S. Fencing Champion (Foil), 1906 and 1914. Competed in 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm. Married Gertrude Ashby Bayne. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr.[27]
John Bayne Breckinridge (1913–1979), Colonel in U.S. Army during World War II. Kentucky State Representative 1956–59, Attorney General of Kentucky 1960–64, 1968–1972, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1960, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1973–79. Son of Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Sr.[28]
Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Jr. (1917–2000) Deputy Inspector General of the C.I.A., author. Married Helen Virden Babbit. Son of Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Sr.[29]
Henry Skillman Breckinridge (1886–1960), Colonel in U.S. Army, United States Assistant Secretary of War, prominent attorney, U.S Fencing Champion (Épée), 1924. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. Married Ruth Bradley Woodman in 1910, member of prominent New England Perkins Family.
Elizabeth Foster Breckinridge (1911–2005), Prominent Washington, D.C. socialite and philanthropist. Daughter of Henry Skillman Breckinridge. Married to John Stephens Graham, attorney, Assistant U.S. Secretary of Treasury, Commissioner of U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Commissioner of Internal Revenue, brother of Katherine G. Howard.
Rev. William Lewis Breckinridge, D. D. (1803–1876) Born at Cabell’s Dale, Fayette County, Kentucky. Presbyterian minister for 45 years. Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Council. Son of John Breckinridge. Married Frances Prevost in 1823, Granddaughter of President Samuel Stanhope Smith of Princeton University.[30]
Francis Preston (1765–1736), Virginia House Delegate 1788–1789 1812–1814, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1793–1797, Virginia State Senator 1816–1820. Cousin of John Brown, John Breckinridge, and James Breckinridge, Grandson of Robert Preston.[31]
William Campbell Preston (1794–1860), South Carolina State Representative 1828–1834, U.S. Senator from South Carolina 1833–1842. Son of Francis Preston.[32]
William Ballard Preston (1805–1862), Virginia House Delegate 1830–1832 1844–1845, Virginia State Senator 1840–1844, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1847–1849, U.S. Secretary of War 1849–1850, Delegate to the Confederate States Congress from Virginia 1861–1862, Confederate States Senator from Virginia 1862. Nephew of Francis Preston.[33]
William Preston (1816–1887), delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1849, Kentucky State Representative 1850 1868–1869, Kentucky State Senator 1851–1853, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1852–1855, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1856, U.S. Minister to Spain 1859–1861. Nephew of Francis Preston.[34]
John Brown (1757–1837), Virginia State Senator 1784–1788, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Virginia 1787–1788, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1789–1792, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1792–1805. Brother of James Brown, Cousin of John Breckinridge, James Breckinridge, and Francis Preston.[35]
B. Gratz Brown (1826–1885), Missouri State Representative 1852–1858, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1860, U.S. Senator from Missouri 1863–1867, Governor of Missouri 1871–1873, candidate for Vice President of the United States 1872. Grandson of John Brown.[36]
James Brown (1766–1835), U.S. District Attorney in Kentucky 1791, Kentucky Secretary of State 1792–1798, Secretary of the Territory of Orleans 1804, U.S. District Attorney in Louisiana 1805–1808, U.S. Senator from Louisiana 1813–1817 1819–1823, U.S. Minister to France 1823–1829. Brother of John Brown, Cousin of John Breckinridge, James Breckinridge, and Francis Preston.[37]
Thomas H. Clay (1803–1871), U.S. Minister to Nicaragua 1863, U.S. Minister to Honduras 1863. Father-in-law of William Campbell Preston Breckinridge.[38]
Henry Donnel Foster (1808–1880), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1843–1847 1871–1873, Pennsylvania State Representative 1857, candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania 1860. Cousin of John C. Breckinridge.[39]
NOTE: Peter B. Porter was also uncle of U.S. Senator Augustus S. Porter.[40] Thomas H. Clay was also son of Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Henry Clay,[41] brother of U.S. Representative James Brown Clay,[42] third cousin of U.S. diplomat Brutus Clay,[43] fourth cousin of U.S. Senator Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr.,[44] first cousin twice removed of U.S. Representative Matthew Clay[45] and Kentucky State Senator Green Clay,[46] third cousin once removed of U.S. Senator Clement Comer Clay,[47] and second cousin once removed of Alabama State Senator Matthew Clay,[48] U.S. Representative Brutus J. Clay,[49] and U.S. diplomat Cassius M. Clay.[50]

“I descend from Col. Robert Breckenridge who was born 1720 in Derry Co., Ireland as was his father Alexander b 1686 in Derry Co., Ireland who married Jane Preston b 1695 in Lima-Vadey, Londonderry (Derry)Co., Ireland. After several of the children were born they moved to Raloo, Antrim Co., Ireland (not that far apart).

“Alexander’s father was John Breckenridge b. in Ayrshire, Scotland and wife Barbara. Both died in Cloger, Tyrone Co., Ireland. His father was Alexander Breckenridge b. in Bradentrae, Ayreshire, Scotland. and died in 1689 in Cloger, Tyrone Co., Ireland.

“Braedalbane mentioned by James Breckenridge is believed to be the name of Bradentrae. The land there is very similar to Kentucky. Except not as cold…”.

This was posted on My GenForum 4-14-99 by “DTBene”, message number 121 of 1305.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Granard

http://thepeerage.com/p2792.htm#i27914

Hon. Mary Stewart [1]
F, #27914,
b. circa 1677,
d. 4 October 1765
Last Edited=19 Jan 2009
Hon. Mary Stewart was born circa 1677.[2] She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.[1],[2]
She married, firstly, Phineas Preston in 1692 at Mountjoy, Ireland.[2],[1]
She married, secondly, Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard, son of Arthur Forbes, 2nd Earl of Granard and Mary Rawdon, in 1709.[1]
She died on 4 October 1765.[1] She was also reported to have died on 4 October 1758.[2]
From 1692, her married name became Preston.[2]
From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston
1. Jane Preston+[2] b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
2. Mary Preston [2] b. 1696, d. 1749
3. Colonel John Preston+[2] b. 1699, d. 1747
4. Nathaniel Preston [2] b. c 1700
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard
1. Lady Mary Forbes [1] d. 27 Nov 1797
2. Lt.-Gen. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard+[1] b. 15 Mar 1710, d. 16 Oct 1769
3. Admiral Hon. John Forbes+[1] b. 1714, d. 10 Mar 1796

Jane Preston [1]
F, #153123,
b. circa 1690,
d. after 12 November 1746
Last Edited=8 Aug 2008
Jane Preston was born circa 1690 at Ireland.[1] She was the daughter of Phineas Preston and Hon. Mary Stewart.[1],[2]
She married Alexander Breckenridge.[1]
She died after 12 November 1746 at Tinkling Springs, Fisherville, Augusta County, Virginia, U.S.A..[1] She was buried at Tinkling Springs Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Fisherville, Augusta County, Virginia, U.S.A..[1]
Her married name became Breckenridge.[1]
She and Alexander Breckenridge emigrated along with their children to North America arriving on 1728.[1]
Children of Jane Preston and Alexander Breckenridge
1. Letitia Breckenridge [1]
2. John Breckenridge [1] b. b 1720
3. George Breckenridge [1] b. b 1720
4. Robert Breckenridge+[1] b. c 1720, d. a 16 Aug 1772
5. James Breckenridge [1] b. b 1740
6. Adam Breckenridge [1] b. b 1740
7. Smith Breckenridge [1] b. b 1740

James BreckinridgeJames Breckinridge (March 7, 1763 – May 13, 1833) was a Virginia lawyer and politician. He served in the Virginia House of Delegates, as well as the U.S. House of Representatives. He also fought in the American Revolutionary War and served as a brigadier-general during the War of 1812.
Breckinridge was born near Fincastle, Botetourt County, Virginia. His brother was John Breckinridge and he was the great-great-great-uncle of John Bayne Breckinridge. He studied under private tutors and during the Revolutionary War, he served in Colonel Preston’s rifle regiment under General Nathanael Greene. He attended Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) and was graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1785. He studied law and was admitted to the bar and practiced in Fincastle.
Political career Breckinridge served as a delegate to the Virginia House of Delegates for the terms 1789-1802, 1806-1808, 1819-1821 and 1823-1824. He took a special interest in the construction of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. He was then elected as a Federalist to the Eleventh Congress and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1809-March 3, 1817). He was an associate of Thomas Jefferson in the establishment of the University of Virginia and served as brigadier general in the War of 1812.
Death and afterward Breckinridge died at his country home, “Grove Hill,” Botetourt County, Virginia, May 13, 1833 and was buried in the family burial plot on his estate near Fincastle.

The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V.[1][2] The Order is composed of five classes in civil and military divisions. In descending order of seniority, these are:
Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (GBE)[a]
Knight Commander or Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE or DBE)
Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE)
Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE)
Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE)
Only the highest two ranks automatically entitle its recipient to become a knight or dame, an honour allowing (but not prescribing) the postulant to use the title “Sir” (male) or “Dame” (female) before his or her first name (though men can be knighted separately from this and other Orders of Chivalry). Honorary knighthoods, given to individuals who are not nationals of a realm where Queen Elizabeth II is Head of State, permit use of the honour as a post-nominal but not as a title before their name. Awards in the Order of the British Empire in the Commonwealth Realms were discontinued with the establishment of national systems of honours and awards such as the Order of Canada, the Order of Australia and the New Zealand Order of Merit. Foreign recipients are classified as honorary members of the Order they receive, and do not contribute to the numbers restricted to that Order as full members do.

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