Rosamunde’s Grail

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scan0080scan0046Five days ago I went to the University of Oregon Library. I had on my great overcoat with the faux fur collar. I wore my barrett with a round golden wreath. The young students were amazed, for I looked like Santa Claus Goes to College. How about Woden.

Everyone wanted to know who I was, or, what was going on in my mind.

“I’ve come foe THE BOOK!” I silently spoke to them with a smile and wink.”

“THE BOOK! You know where THE BOOK is?” they cried in unison.
“Do I look like I know were the book is?”
“Uh-huh!”
“It is under the arm of the bull that liveth in the labyrinth. I have come to read the words, and free you all, so we will own wisdom and HIS STORY.”

Going to the elevator, it opened, and one of the four folks aboard, asked;

“Is this the first floor!” and they stared at this – GREAT MAN – that stood before them – like Saint Peter.

It was all I could do to stop myself from saying;

“Why no. This is the headquarters of the Priory de Sion. You do not belong here. How did you find this floor. You must come with.”

You can not GET THERE without being mad, I concluded as I ROSE ALONE to the top floor.

Finding the book in the maze, I saw a comfy chair at the end of the isle. Above this chair, was a window. Out the window, was a sunset, a colorful palet across the sky, with bare branched trees. I had arrived The Artist turned Scholar.

I sat down, and opened the book. It was there. I had found THE GRAIL.

The NAME of this book, that was written in the twelfth century, will be revealed in my book.

In 1997 I made a copy of the Cote of Arms seen above, in this library. Fair Rosamond Clifford is in this genealogy, as is her son, William Longsword. The Pont, Pontius, Ponteus line married into the De Toine family. You can trace these two Rose Lines to Rollo – and beyond. The Merovingians are here, as is David – and God. You will find Woden and other gods and goddesses.

Closing the book, I let out a great sigh, for I had recaptured the Jon Gregory I was before my daughter came into my life. I felt betrayed – and crucified because she is not with me in my great moement of victory. For there is no greater grief then to be a father whose child does not believe in him and HIS STORY, their HISTORY. That my kindred went to great lengths to have my daughter doubt me – even hate me – is more then one can bare. But, true Scholarship goes like this………just like this! This is not a work of fiction. I own the right clues!

You who have trespassed agsinst me, will make ammends, or HISTORY itelf, will bury you. For I will never be that alone in the world, again. For my Muse is with me, and, the woman I was once married to. Of course Christine Rosamond Benton, is here – and why not my mother, Rosemary! For I have been blessed i my Quest, with a beautiful mother, a besutiful sister, a beautiful wife, and a beautiful Muse. And, then there is my grandson, Tlyer Hunt, whom I nicknamed, SCEAF. You will find his name in THE TREE.

Once upon a time I believed I was blessed with a beautiful daughter. But, that was just one too many blessings for some folk. We shall see. Time will tell.

I even had a beautiful best friend named Bill Arnold, who comes from a famous Viking stock. I dedicate this post to him. Bill died on my eighteenth birthday.

William Fitz Pontius’ second son was named Dru, or Drago, which means ‘Dragon’ . There are three dragons in the other Clifford cote of arms. One is an infant, a NEWBORN.

I was born during a star shower when tens of thousands of stars came out of the eye of the constelation Draco. The Cliffords descend from the Kings of Troy. You are in the center of the Rose Labyrith. Behold…….THE BEAUTY!

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

http://fabpedigree.com/s076/f002615.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s096/f035024.htm

,http://fabpedigree.com/s004/f579799.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s036/f836959.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s040/f836959.htm

Richard Fitz Pons[1] (c. 1080–1129)[2] was an Anglo-Norman nobleman, active as a marcher lord on the border with Wales.
He is described as a follower of Bernard de Neufmarche, and probably first builder of Bronllys Castle.[3] He started construction at Llandovery Castle[4] in 1116.[5]
[edit] Family
His father was Pons fitz Pons.[6][7]
He married Matilda Fitz Walter (died after 1127), daughter of Walter Fitz Roger, sheriff of Gloucester, and Bertha de Ballun.[8] Walter de Clifford was one of their four children.[9][10]
Richard was the heir of Drogo fitz Pons and Walter fitz Pons, both mentioned in the Domesday Survey. He is now taken to be their nephew.[11] They had lands in Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Pinxton in Derbyshire, Glasshampton in Worcestershire[12][13]

Walter of Gloucester (also Walter FitzRoger or Walter de Pitres) (d. c. 1129) was an early Anglo-Norman official of the King of England during the early years of the Norman conquest of the South Welsh Marches. He was a sheriff of Gloucester and also a Constable under Henry I.
Contents
 [hide] 
1 Life
2 Family
3 Notes
4 References
[edit] Life
Walter of Gloucester was the son of Roger de Pitres, and his wife, Adeliza[a][1] and was the earliest to use the style “of Gloucester” in his family.[2] A landholder himself at the time of Domesday, by 1095 Walter had control of the bulk of the estates formerly held by Roger his father and Durand his uncle. In addition Walter acquired other estates by royal grants.[3] These estates were principally in four shires, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Hertfordshire and Wiltshire.[3]
He was hereditary High Sheriff of Gloucestershire in 1097 and 1105-6.[4] Sometimes called Constable of England he may only have been constable of Gloucester Castle[5] He recorded as being a constable of the royal household of Henry I from 1114 on.[6] Walter erected or had a part in the erection of the castles of Bristol and Rochester as well as the Tower of London.[7] Walter donated Westwood to Gloucester Abbey for the soul of his brother Herbert and confirmed a grant of Colne by his father Roger.[1] He endowed the canons of Llanthony Priory in Wales with lands from his lordship of Beryntone and retired to the abbey in his old age where he died a monk and was buried in the chapter house,[7] about 1129.[8]

ID: I8624
Name: William LONGSWORD
Sex: M
Birth: 0900 in Normandy, France
Death: 17 DEC 0942
Occupation: 2nd Duke of Normandy
Note: Assassinated

Father: Rollo (Robert) RAGNVALDSSON b: 0870 in Norway
Mother: Poppa DE VALOIS b: 08??

Marriage 1 Sprota (Adela) DE SENLIS b: 0910 in Brittany, France
Children
1. Richard I SANSPEUR b: 0933 in Fecamp, France
2. Raoul D’IVRY b: 09??

Marriage 2 Luitgarda of VERMANDOIS b: 09??
Married: 0935

Name: Rollo (Robert) RAGNVALDSSON
Sex: M
Birth: 0870 in Norway
Baptism: 0912
Death: BEF 0933 in Rouen, Normandy, France
Occupation: 1st Duke of Normandy
Note:
Of Norway
Rollo, baptised as Robert

Marriage 1 Poppa DE VALOIS b: 08??
Married: 0886
Children
1. William LONGSWORD b: 0900 in Normandy, France
2. Robert of CORBEIL b: 08??
3. Crespina b: 08??
4. Gerletta b: 08??
5. Kathlin b: 09??
6. Adele of NORMANDY b: ABT 0917 in Normandy, France

Marriage 2 Gisela b: 08??
Married: 0912

http://www.daltondatabank.org/Chronicles/RDaltonBook/19.htm

Longsword, William (1196-1226), the natural son of Henry II. by “Fair Rosamund;” he was made Earl of Salisbury, and distinguished himself in the Crusades. His son, William (died 1250), was deprived of his earldom by Henry III., and was slain in the Crusades.

CHAPTER XIX
THE BOWER OF “FAIR ROSAMOND”
THE story of “Fair Rosamond” and her mazy Bower, though it cannot lay claim to that standard of authenticity which is generally required of historical data, has for so long occupied an honoured position in the realm of popular romance that, in a book professing to treat of mazes from a broad point of view, we cannot dismiss it quite as briefly as we might perhaps do in a book on English history.
“Fair Rosamond” has been stated, without very much foundation, to have been the daughter of Walter de Clifford, and is in consequence frequently referred to as Rosamond Clifford.
The story runs that King Henry the Second (A.D. 1133 to 1189) adopted her as his mistress, and that, in order to conceal his illicit amours from his Queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine, he conducted them within the innermost recesses of a most complicated maze which he caused to be made in his park at Woodstock. Rumours of her spouse’s defections having reached the ears of Queen Eleanor, that indignant lady contrived to penetrate the labyrinth, confronted her terrified and tearful rival, and forced her to choose between the dagger and the bowl of poison; she drained the latter and became forthwith defunct.
Various trimmings, more or less scandalous in nature,
p. 165
gathered around the central tale, as, for instance, that Rosamond presented Henry with the son who was afterwards known as William Longsword, Earl of Salisbury, but the main outline as indicated above was handed down intact for many generations.
The poisoning incident is not mentioned in the account given by a chronicler of that time, John Brompton, Abbot of Jervaulx (Yorks). It seems to have been first recorded by a French scribe in the fourteenth century.
Brompton’s version, given under the year 1151 in his “Chronicon,” is as follows:
“Sane idem rex Henricus quanquam multis virtutibus fuerat ornatus, aliquibus tamen viciis involutus personam regiam deturpavit. In libidine namque pronus conjugalem modum excessit. Regina enim sua Elianora jamdudum incarcerata factus est adulter manifestus, palam et impudice puellam retinens Rosamundam. Huic nempe puellae spectatissimae fecerat rex apud Wodestoke mirabilis architecturae cameram operi Daedalino similem, ne forsan a regina facile deprehenderetur. Sed ilia cito obiit, et apud Godestowe juxta Oxoniam in capitulo monialium in tumba decenti est sepulta, ubi talis suprascriptio invenitur:
“Hic facet in tumba Rosa mundi, non Rosa munda;
Non redolet, sed olet, quae redolere solet.”
It would appear from this account that the “bower” was a labyrinth of an architectural kind, perhaps like that mentioned in Chapter XIV as having been built at Ardres by Louis of Bourbourg in the previous century, not, as popularly believed, a maze of evergreens. It will be seen, also, that Henry did not long enjoy his clandestine delights, for Rosamond shortly died and was buried before the high altar of the nunnery church of Godstowe. Her death is believed to have taken place about 1176. It is possible that she had entered the nunnery some time
p. 166
before that. According to the contemporary annalist Roger de Hoveden her body was removed in 1191 by Bishop Hugh of Lincoln, on moral grounds, and was apparently re-interred in the chapter-house.
The imprisonment of Queen Eleanor, referred to by Brompton, was a consequence of her connivance at the rebellion of her sons in 1173-74.
Ranulph Higden, who lived in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, deals with the Henry and Rosamond story in the seventh book of his “Polychronicon,” and tells us that visitors to Godstowe Abbey used to be shown a wonderful coffer which had belonged to Rosamond. It contained figures of birds, beasts, fishes and boxing men, which, by clockwork or springs, were endowed with apparently spontaneous motion (Cista ejusdem puella vix bipedalis mensura, sed mirabilis architectura ibidem cernitur; in qua conflictus pugilem, gestus animalium, volatus avium, saltus piscium, absque hominis impulsu conspiciuntur).
Most of the subsequent chroniclers seem to have followed Higden in their relation of the story. By Tudor times the romantic and tragic episode had become a favourite theme in popular lore; it was enshrined by the Elizabethan poet Drayton in his “Epistle to Rosamond,” the bower being therein described as an arrangement of subterranean vaults. It achieved its greatest popularity, however, in the ballad form, and was printed, with several other “Strange Histories or Songs and Sonnets of Kinges, Princes, Dukes, Lords, Ladyes, Knights and Gentlemen, etc.,” in a black-letter volume written or edited by Thomas Delone (or Delorney) in 1612. Two editions of the ballad were represented in the collection of Samuel Pepys, under the title of “The Life and Death of Rosamond, King Henry the Second’s Concubine. And how she was Poysoned to Death by Queen Elenor.”
John Aubrey, in his “Remaines,” 1686, tells us that his nurse used to sing the following verses to him:
p. 167
“Yea, Rosamond, fair Rosamond,
  Her name was called so,
To whom dame Elinor our Queene
  Was known a deadly foe,
The King therefore for her defence
  Against the furious Queene
At Woodstocke builded such a Bower
  The like was never seen.
“Most curiously that Bower was built
  Of stone and timber strong.
An hundered and fifty dores
  Did to this Bower belong,
And they so cunningly contriv’d
  With turnings round about
That none but with a clew of thread
  Could enter in or out.”
[paragraph continues] The whole ballad will be found in the well-known “Reliques of Ancient English Poetry,” collected by Bishop Percy and published by him in 1765.
Of a widely different nature was the version published in 1729 by Samuel Croxall in his “Select Collection of Novels,” Vol. IV. “The Loves of King Henry II and Fair Rosamond.” Here the attitude assumed is one of learned contempt for popular credulity. “What have we in this Story,” says Croxall, “but a Copy of Ariadne’s Clue and the Cretan Labyrinth? . . . Yet are we not to wonder that the monkish Historians should deliver down to us a Tale of such Absurdity, when the same Chronicles tell us that, in that King’s Reign, a Dragon of marvellous Bigness was seen at St. Osyth’s in Essex, which, by its very motion, set many Houses and Buildings on Fire.”
As for the inscription on Rosamond’s tomb, quoted by Brompton, our critic is equally scornful. “The conceit,” he says, “is poor and common and, like the other Poetry of those times, depends on a certain Jingle and Play on the Words. The sense of them has been thus expressed in honest English Metre:”
(Whether the verse is in better taste when expressed in
p. 168
honest English metre the reader must judge for himself.)
“Rose of the World, not Rose the peerless Flow’r,
Within this Tomb hath taken up her Bow’r.
She scenteth now, and nothing Sweet doth smell
Who earst was wont to savour passing well.”
[paragraph continues] This rendering is perhaps preferable to that of Stowe (“Annals,” 1631), which concludes with:
“Though she were sweete, now foully doth she stinke,
A mirrour good for all men, that on her thinke.”
In any case the epitaph must be accounted a libel in one respect, for Leland, the Antiquary to Henry VIII, records that, on the opening of Rosamond’s tomb, at the dissolution of Godstowe nunnery, the bones were found to be encased in leather, surrounded by lead, and that “a very swete smell came out of it.”
An interesting point mentioned by Croxall is that in his time “a delightful Bower” was still in existence at Woodstock and was shown as the original of the story. Another reliable writer of the same period (Thomas Hearne, 1718) makes a similar observation, but in this case it is made clear that the remains are those of a large building, not, as we might have inferred, those of a hedge maze or arbour. These remains, whatever they may have been, have disappeared long since.
Woodstock Park, according to the historian Rouse of Warwick, was the first park to be made in England. Henry the First had a palace here, but the present great building, the masterpiece of Sir John Vanbrugh, was built for the first Duke of Marlborough and was named after the scene of his famous victory, Blenheim.
The traditional story of Fair Rosamond, in which she is made to figure as a cruelly wronged and guileless damsel of impregnable virtue and the victim of an unreasoning jealousy, formed the basis of many novels,
p. 169
e.g., “Fair Rosamond,” by T. Miller (“The Parlour Library”), 1847, and as late as 1911 it was cast into the form of a one-act tragedy by Mr. Oliver W. F. Lodge, under the name of “The Labyrinth,” and was first performed by the Pilgrim Players on October 14 in that year. A little-known opera by Addison deals with the same theme; it is entitled “Rosamond” and is inscribed to the Duchess of Marlborough. The most poignant and beautiful version of the tragedy is that given by Swinburne in his “Rosamond” (not, of course, to be confused with his “Rosamund”).
Tennyson, in his “Becket,” makes that prelate rescue Rosamond from the Queen at the crucial moment and take her to Godstowe nunnery, whence she later escapes to intercede—ineffectually—with his murderers in Canterbury Cathedral.
No authentic portrait of Rosamond is known to exist, but in Hampton Court Palace, just outside Cardinal Wolsey’s Room, there hangs a half-length female portrait by an unknown painter (No. 961 [937]), which is labelled Rosamond Clifford. The lady depicted, however, is attired in a fashion which did not obtain until considerably later than the time of Rosamond; in fact, there seems to be no justification whatever for assuming that the picture represents the fair Rosamond at all, except perhaps in the imagination of the artist.

Henry I Beauclerc King of England
Born: 1068, Selby, York, England
Married to Nesta, Princess of Deheubarth
Other relationship with Concubine of Henry I
Married to Sybilla Corbet
Died: 1 Dec 1135, Anges, Maine-et-Loire, France

HENRY I (r. 1100-1135)

William’s [William II Rufus] younger brother Henry succeeded to the throne. He was crowned three days after his brother’s death, against the possibility that his eldest brother Robert might claim the English throne. After the decisive battle of Tinchebrai in 1106 in France, Henry completed his conquest of Normandy from Robert, who then (unusually even for that time) spent the last 28 years of his life as his brother’s prisoner. An energetic, decisive and occasionally cruel ruler, Henry centralised the administration of England and Normandy in the royal court, using ‘viceroys’ in Normandy and a group of advisers in England to act on his behalf when he was absent across the Channel. Henry successfully sought to increase royal revenues, as shown by the official records of his exchequer (the Pipe Roll of 1130, the first exchequer account to survive). He established peaceful relations with Scotland, through his marriage to Mathilda of Scotland.

Henry’s name ‘Beauclerc’ denoted his good education (as the youngest son, his parents possibly expected that he would become a bishop); Henry was probably the first Norman king to be fluent in English. In 1120, his legitimate sons William and Richard drowned in the White Ship which sank in the English Channel. This posed a succession problem, as Henry never allowed any of his illegitimate children to expect succession to either England or Normandy. Henry had a legitimate daughter Matilda (widow of Emperor Henry V, subsequently married to the Count of Anjou). However, it was his nephew Stephen (reigned 1135-54), son of William the Conqueror’s daughter Adela, who succeeded Henry after his death, allegedly caused by eating too many lampreys (fish) in 1135, as the barons mostly opposed the idea of a female ruler.

Official Website of the Royal Family – http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page54.asp ————————————————————————

Henry I, the most resilient of the Norman kings (his reign lasted thirty-five years), was nicknamed “Beauclerc” (fine scholar) for his above average education. During his reign, the differences between English and Norman society began to slowly evaporate. Reforms in the royal treasury system became the foundation upon which later kings built. The stability Henry afforded the throne was offset by problems in succession: his only surviving son, William, was lost in the wreck of the White Ship in November 1120.

The first years of Henry’s reign were concerned with subduing Normandy. William the Conqueror divided his kingdoms between Henry’s older brothers, leaving England to William Rufus and Normandy to Robert. Henry inherited no land but received £5000 in silver. He played each brother off of the other during their quarrels; both distrusted Henry and subsequently signed a mutual accession treaty barring Henry from the crown. Henry’s hope arose when Robert departed for the Holy Land on the First Crusade; should William die, Henry was the obvious heir. Henry was in the woods hunting on the morning of August 2, 1100 when William Rufus was killed by an arrow. His quick movement in securing the crown on August 5 led many to believe he was responsible for his brother’s death. In his coronation charter, Henry denounced William’s oppressive policies and promising good government in an effort to appease his barons. Robert returned to Normandy a few weeks later but escaped final defeat until the Battle of Tinchebrai in 1106; Robert was captured and lived the remaining twenty-eight years of his life as Henry’s prisoner.

Henry was drawn into controversy with a rapidly expanding Church. Lay investiture, the king’s selling of clergy appointments, was heavily opposed by Gregorian reformers in the Church but was a cornerstone of Norman government. Henry recalled Anselm of Bec to the archbishopric of Canterbury to gain baronial support, but the stubborn Anselm refused to do homage to Henry for his lands. The situation remained unresolved until Pope Paschal II threatened Henry with excommunication in 1105. He reached a compromise with the papacy: Henry rescinded the king’s divine authority in conferring sacred offices but appointees continued to do homage for their fiefs. In practice, it changed little – the king maintained the deciding voice in appointing ecclesiastical offices – but it a marked a point where kingship became purely secular and subservient in the eyes of the Church.

By 1106, both the quarrels with the church and the conquest of Normandy were settled and Henry concentrated on expanding royal power. He mixed generosity with violence in motivating allegiance to the crown and appointing loyal and gifted men to administrative positions. By raising men out of obscurity for such appointments, Henry began to rely less on landed barons as ministers and created a loyal bureaucracy. He was deeply involved in continental affairs and therefore spent almost half of his time in Normandy, prompting him to create the position of justiciar – the most trusted of all the king’s officials, the justiciar literally ruled in the king’s stead. Roger of Salisbury, the first justiciar, was instrumental in organizing an efficient department for collection of royal revenues, the Exchequer. The Exchequer held sessions twice a year for sheriffs and other revenue-collecting officials; these officials appeared before the justiciar, the chancellor, and several clerks and rendered an account of their finances. The Exchequer was an ingenious device for balancing amounts owed versus amounts paid. Henry gained notoriety for sending out court officials to judge local financial disputes (weakening the feudal courts controlled by local lords) and curb errant sheriffs (weakening the power bestowed upon the sheriffs by his father).

The final years of his reign were consumed in war with France and difficulties ensuring the succession. The French King Louis VI began consolidating his kingdom and attacked Normandy unsuccessfully on three separate occasions. The succession became a concern upon the death of his son William in 1120: Henry’s marriage to Adelaide was fruitless, leaving his daughter Matilda as the only surviving legitimate heir. She was recalled to Henry’s court in 1125 after the death of her husband, Emperor Henry V of Germany. Henry forced his barons to swear an oath of allegiance to Matilda in 1127 after he arranged her marriage to the sixteen-year-old Geoffrey of Anjou to cement an Angevin alliance on the continent. The marriage, unpopular with the Norman barons, produced a male heir in 1133, which prompted yet another reluctant oath of loyalty from the aggravated barons. In the summer of 1135, Geoffrey demanded custody of certain key Norman castles as a show of good will from Henry; Henry refused and the pair entered into war. Henry’s life ended in this sorry state of affairs – war with his son-in-law and rebellion on the horizon – in December 1135.

http://www.deloriahurst.com/deloriahurst%20page/1459.html

Harold Bluetooth Gormson (Danish Harald Blåtand) (ca 911- November 1, 987), sometimes Harold II, succeeded his father Gorm the Old as king of Denmark in 935 (or 940) and king of Norway in 936.

Invading Normandy in 945 in support of Richard the Fearless, Harold’s forces took the French king Louis IV prisoner and forced his recognition of Richard’s rule. Harold subsequently controlled Norway for a time.

Although his predecessors had accepted Christianity at the instigation of the Frankish Carolingian kings in 826, many Danes and other northerners were still heathens for centuries. Harald Bluetooth was (again ?) forced to accept Christianity, following defeat (972) by the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. Otto had already founded many bishoprics including Schleswig, Ribe and Aarhus on the Jutland Peninsula. After his conversion to Christianity, Harold remained a faithful ally of the empire. Otto the Great died in 983 and Harold made his way to the Eider river, but he had to take refuge at Jomsburg in northern Germany when he was fought by not yet christianized Danes. Harold died in battle against the forces of his son and successor Sweyn.

Harald may have had three wives or consorts: Thora, Gunhilde and Gyrid. He had four children: Håkon, Sweyn, Gunhild and Thyra.

Gorm the Old,(Danish: Gorm den Gamle, died between 936-958) was the father of Harold Bluetooth. Gorm, a Jutland chieftain, was born in 840. In 899 he became king of the Danes and as king he resided in Jelling, where he set up a monument for his wife Thyra.

It is believed that it is his skeleton that has been found at the church of Jelling. At the time of the reign of Gorm, the Danes believed in the Norse pantheon and it was not until Harold Bluetooth became king that the Danes converted to Christianity.

It is believed that Harold moved the skeleton of his father from the original grave into the church. Why he simply didn’t build the church on top of his father’s grave remains a mystery. Some historians have considered this a result of a dispute between Gorm and Harold.

http://www.deloriahurst.com/deloriahurst%20page/3308.html

http://www.deloriahurst.com/deloriahurst%20page/1664.html

Rollo Rognvaldsson “The Dane” Duke of Normandy
Born: Abt 846, Maer, NOrd-Trondelag, Norway
Married to Papia (Poppa) de Senlis
Died: Abt 931, Notre Dame, Rouen, Normandie, Neustria

Also known as Hrolf the Ganger or Rollon, 1st Duke of Normandy from 911 to 927, called also Rolf the Walker, because, being so tall, he preferred to go afoot rather than ride the little Norwegian horses. Also shown as Rollon, Row, or Robert. Originally a Norse Viking, he was noted for strength and martial prowess. In the reign of Charles II the Bald, he sailed up the Seine River and took Rouen, which he kept as a base of operations. He gained a number of victories over the Franks, and extorted the cession of the province since called Normandy. By the famous treaty which Charles the Bald and Rollo signed the latter agreed to adopt Christianity. He was born in 846 and died in 932, and was buried in the Cathedral at Rouen.
——————————————————-
From: http://sbaldw.home.mindspring.com/hproject/prov/rollo000.htm

Commentary
Supposed father: Rognvaldr, jarl of Møre.

Supposed mother: Ragnhildr or Hildr.

The origin of Rollo is contraversial. There are several medieval sources which claim to give information about the origin of Rollo, the most widely repeated of which would make him a son of Rognvaldr, jarl of Møre by Ragnhildr or Hildr. As can be seen from the following brief notices, the various primary sources offer very contradictory information about Rollo’s origin.

The earliest author to attribute an explicit origin to Rollo was Richer of Rheims, writing between 996 and 998, who called Rollo the son of another Viking invader of France named Catillus (presumably representing the Norse name Ketil) [Richer i, 28 (see PL 138: 35)]. Since Catillus appears to be a legendary individual, this account has generally been discredited, probably correctly [see Douglas 420-1].

According to Dudo of St. Quentin (writing early 11th century), author of the earliest history of the Normans, Rollo had a younger brother named Gurim, presumed to be the familiar name Gorm. Dudo states that Rollo and Gurim were sons of a man who held many lands in “Dacia” (Dudo’s word for Denmark, following other authors), and that after the death of the (unnamed) father of Rollo and Gurim, the king of Dacia fought against the sons, killing Gurim and driving Rollo out [Dudo ii, 2-4 (pp. 26-7)]. Dudo later refers to duke Richard I as being related to a “king of Dacia” named Haigrold [Dudo iv, 84-88 (pp. 114-20 passim)], who must have been the Viking raider of France of that name [Flodoard's Annals, s.a. 945, see PL 135: 463-4, van Houts 51], and not king Harald “Bluetooth” of Denmark. Note that Gurim cannot be the famous Gorm “the Old” of Denmark, who survived Rollo by many years.

William of Malmesbury (early 12th century) appears to be the earliest author to attribute a Norwegian origin to Rollo [WM ii, 5 (p. 125)].

As is well known, the Orkneyinga Saga (late twelfth century) [OrkS 4 (pp. 29-30)], followed by other Icelandic sources (such as the well known Heimskringla and Landnámabók), gives Rollo the name Hrólfr, and make him a son of Rognvaldr, jarl of Møre, and brother of (among others) jarl Torf-Einarr of the Orkneys [OI 1: 187]. Earlier sources, such as Ari’s Íslendingabók (early to middle 12th century), mention Rognvald of Møre and his son Hrollaugr who settled in Iceland, but not the supposed connection to the dukes of Normandy [Ari 49, 61]. A poem allegedly written by Einar mentions his brothers, including a Hrólfr, but does not connect Hrólfr to Normandy, and does not name a Gorm among the brothers. (See the page on Rognvaldr for more on this poem.)

Historia Gruffud vab Kenan (ca. 1250), apparently a Welsh translation and/or revision of an earlier Latin life of Gruffudd ap Cynan, gives Haraldr Hárfagri of Norway (“Harald Harfagyr”) a brother named Rodulf (i.e., the Latin form of Hrólfr) who is called the founder of Normandy [HGK, 3-4]. However, this is evidently a corrupt version of the Scandinavian version, and the suggestion that Rollo was a brother of Haraldr Hárfagri need not be given any credence.

The most prominent argument of the case for accepting the Scandinavian account that Rollo was the same person as Hrólfr, son of Rognvaldr of Møre, was given by D. C. Douglas [Douglas 419-23], and those who accept this identification have generally followed the same arguments. On the other side, arguments against the identification were given by Viggo Starcke in his book Denmark in World History [Starcke 222-7].

Most of the argument of Douglas consists of accepting the tale of the sagas and rejecting evidence from the Norman sources which contradict the saga version, while explaining away the problems (on which more below). The evidence which Douglas puts forward as “a powerful, if not a conclusive, argument in favor of the identity of Rollo with Ganger-Rolf” concerns a passage in Landnáamabók that refers to a daughter of Gongu-Hrólfr:

“… Annarr son Óttars vas Helge; hann herjaðe á Skottland, ok feck þar at herfange Niðbiorgo, dóttor Beolans konungs ok Caðlínar, dóttor Gongo-Hrólfs” (Another son of Óttarr was Helge. He harried in Scotland, and won there as his booty Niðbjorg, daughter of king Beolan and Caðlín, daughter of Gongu-Hrólfr.) [OI 1: 66-7]

This passage, which Douglas attributed to “Ari the Learned” (who may or may not have been the author), is then compared with a passage from the nearly contemporary Plaintsong of Rollo’s son William “Longsword” which was written soon after William’s death:

“Hic in orbe transmarino natus patre
in errore paganorum permanente
matre quoque consignata alma fide
sacra fuit lotus unda”
(Born overseas from a father who stuck to the pagan error and from a mother who was devoted to the sweet religion, he was blessed with the holy chrism.)
[Douglas 422 (Latin); van Houts 41 (English translation)]

After explaining that the two stories are consistent with one another, Douglas then state that “[t]he suggestion of the Landnámabók is thus confirmed by an epic poem composed in Gaul in the tenth century.” While it is true that the two accounts as they stand are consistent with each other and with the claim that Rollo and Gongu-Hrólfr were the same man (ignoring all other evidence), it is surely a gross overstatement to claim that the Plaintsong “confirms” the other account, for there is not a single statement in the passage from Landnámabók that is confirmed by the Plaintsong. This is a clear case of circular reasoning, for without first assuming that Rollo and Gongu-Hrólfr were the same man, there is no evidence that the two passages have any relation whatsoever. Douglas’s case is further undermined by the fact that another source [Laxdœla Saga chapter 32, see OI 1: 246] makes Niðbjorg’s mother Caðlín a daughter of Gongu-Hrólfr, son of Oxna-Þórir, directly contradicting the thesis that Caðlín was supposedly a granddaughter of Rognvaldr of Møre. Yet, Douglas apparently regarded this as the strongest part of his argument.

There are three main strands of evidence (somewhat related to each other) against the identification of Rollo with Hrólfr son of Rognvaldr:

1. The discrepancies between the Norman and Icelandic sources.
Among other contradictions, the Norman sources give Rollo a brother named Gurim, while the Icelandic sources give Hrólfr several brothers, none of them named Gormr (the presumed Old-Norse form for Gurim). Although both of the sources have their problems, earlier native sources would seem to have a higher priority than later foreign sources. While many elements of the Dudo’s account are clearly legendary, there appears to be no clear motive on the part of Dudo (writing less than a century after Rollo’s death) to invent a younger brother for Rollo who is then immediately killed off.

2. The general unreliability of Norse source for the early tenth century.
For the period under consideration, i.e., the early ninth century, the sagas have a poor record for reliability, even for Scandinavian history. For example, consider the following words of Peter Sawyer (written with regard to a different matter, but true in general), a well known expert on early Viking history: “… These sagas cannot, however, be accepted as reliable sources for the tenth century. The only trustworthy evidence for the tenth century in those sagas are the contemporary verses around which the saga writers wove their tales.” [Sawyer 42] None of these verses confirm the identity of Rollo and Hrólfr. The suspicion is made even larger by the fact that the Icelandic sources show no knowledge of Norman history other than the fact (well known throughout Europe at the time) that William the Conqueror was a descendant of the dukes of Normandy.

3. Rollo and Hrólfr appear to be different names.
The natural Latinization of the name Hrólfr would be Radulfus or Rodulfus. Yet, the Frankish and Norman sources consistently refer to the founder of Normandy as Rollo. Since these sources also include numerous individuals named Rodulfus, and consistently separate the two names, it appears that the names were regarded as different. Douglas explained this by suggesting a hypothetical hypochoristic form “Hrolle” of the name “Hroðwulf” as the basis for the name Rollo, and provides a single charter in which Rollo is referred to as “Rolphus” as evidence that the names were the same, acknowledging, however, that the charter itself was “not above suspicion.” If the names were really regarded as the same, it would be expected that more convincing evidence to this effect could be offered.

Personally, I am inclined to believe that the identification of Hrólfr and Rollo has no basis in fact, that it was likely to have been invented by a saga writer who wanted to give the jarls of Orkney some famous relatives (i.e., the kings of England), and that whatever the confusing Norman sources say are probably about the closest we are going to get to Rollo’s origin. However, based on the surviving evidence, it is not possible to come to any definitive conclusion one way or the other, and Rollo’s parentage should be listed as “unknown” unless further evidence becomes available.

Supposed second wife:

Gisla, said to be daughter of Charles the Simple, king of France [Dudo, 46-7, 53]. She is unknown in the Frankish sources. The fact that Charles the Simple’s kinsman Charles the Fat had a daughter also named Gisla who married a Viking (Godefridus) in the ninth century has led to the natural suspicion that this Gisla is an invention based on the earlier woman of the name. If she existed at all, there is no reason to believe that she was a mother of any of Rollo’s children.

Supposed additional child:

Caðlin (Kathleen), said by Norse sources to have married a certain king Beolan, who is otherwise unidentified. As discussed above, the evidence for her is less than satisfactory.

http://www.deloriahurst.com/deloriahurst%20page/3308.html

William “Longsword” Duke of Normandy
Born: Abt 876, Normandie, Neustria
Married Abt 932, Normandie, France, to Espriota de Bretagne
Died: Abt 942, France

Pepin II, de Senlis Count of Peronne
Born: Abt 817, Vermandois, Neustria
Died: Abt 892, Milan, Italy

Pepin II, Count of Senlis, Peronne and St. Quentin
Count Berenger of Bretagne Count of Bayeux

http://www.deloriahurst.com/deloriahurst%20page/1788.html

Dagobert III King of France
Born: Abt 687, France
Died: 19 Jun 715 or 16

King of the Franks 711-716
In 711, Dagobert III succeeded to act as the next Merovingian puppet king, dominated by the Austrasian Mayor Charles Martel.
———————–
Dagobert III
Encyclopædia Britannica Article

born 699
died 715/716

Merovingian Frankish king who succeeded his father, Childebert III, in 711. For most of his reign the boy was dominated by Pippin II of Herstal, the Austrasian mayor of the palace.

http://www.deloriahurst.com/deloriahurst%20page/1807.html

Merovaeus (Merovius) (Meerweg) King of the Salic Franks
Born: Abt 411, France
Married Abt 435 to Verica [Merovee] ??
Died: Abt 458

Titles: Traditionally called king of the Franks (Roi des Francs)
Reign: 447/448 – 456/457 (traditional dates)
End of reign: 456/457 (traditional dates), died
Name/byname: Also called: in English Merovech, Merovich, Meroveus, Merwich or Merowig; in German: Merowech

Mérovée was probably the relative (1) or the son (2) of Clodion. He governed the Salian Franks, from whom Frankish tradition held the Merovingian dynasty to have taken its name. Nothing definite is known of Mérovée’s life. He is mentioned in Gregory of Tours’s History of the Franks and, according to later sources, fought along with Ætius and king of the Visigoths Theodoric I against Attila the Hun at the Battle of the Catalaunian Plains (451). Mérovée expanded the borders of his kingdom to the Roman provinces Belgica Secunda and Germania.

Notes: (1) Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks, Book 2, chapter 9; (2) The Fredegarius Chronicle, III, 9.

Sources: Text: R. P. Anselme, Histoire de la maison royale de France et des grands officiers de la Couronne, Paris: Estienne Loyson, 1674; The Britannica Encyclopædia, Multimedia Edition, ©1994-1998;

Argotta of the Franks
Born: Abt 376, France
Married Abt 394 to Pharamond King of the Franks

http://www.deloriahurst.com/deloriahurst%20page/5353.html

Grimald Duke of the West Franks

Nicknames:
“Argotta Queen of the (Salic) Franks”, “De Thuringia”, “Kings Of France”, “wife of The King of the Franks”, “wife of the King of Westphalia”, “Argotta av Friesland”, “Argotta Sicambria”
Birthdate:
circa 376
Birthplace:
Sicambria,Western Europe,,France
Death:
Died 438 in Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Occupation:
Queen of the Franks, ABT 0376, Koningin van de Franken, Princesse, des Cimbres, Princess France/Sicambrian Heiress,

Queen Argotta Rosamunde Cimbri

http://www.halexandria.org/dward933.htm

Faramund (Lord Pharamond of the West Franks) (CE 419-430), is an early king of the Franks first referred to in the anonymous 8th century Carolingian text Liber Historiae Francorum, wherein the anonymous author begins by writing of the Trojan origin for the Franks.
[Besides being in the Trojan royal line, the Carolingians are due for a prominent place in the annals of history... and thus should be given their due even now in the course of this MOAFT.]
married Princess Argotta, a descendant of the Sicambrian Franks
Children:
Clodion of Tournai, King of the Salian Franks, King Clodion le Chevelu, of Tournai
Frotmund (according to Gardner)
Fredemundus, Sire of the Franks (according to Gardner)
Duke Adelbertus of Moselle (according to Ancestry.com)
The story is told of the election of the first Frankish king. After the death of Sunno, his brother Marcomer, leader of the Ampsivarii and Chatti, proposed to the Franks that they should have one single king… a suggestion directly contrary to their tradition. The story goes that Pharamond was chosen as this first king (thus beginning the tradition of long-haired kings of the Franks). When he died, his son Clodion was raised up as the next king. The work says no more of him.
Someone named Pharamond also appears as the king of France in the Prose Tristan and later Arthurian works. A god called Pharamond also appears in Neil Gaiman’s Sandman as a provider of transportation for the gods and higher beings. It appears he also has a large amount of control over human transportation as well. He calls himself the last member of his pantheon. Finally, Pharamond is mentioned in William Shakespeare’s Henry V, Act I, Scene 2, as the originator of the Salic law banning women from succession to the throne of France. [I mention the scene inasmuch as no one wants to wade through a Shakespearean play looking for a very brief cameo appearance. You're welcome.]
 
2. Argotta [110] Genobaud, Lord of the Franks [109] Dagobert [108] Clodius [107] Theodomir [106] Richemir [105] Dagobert (c. 317 CE) [104] Sicambrian Franks [1-103] …
Argotta, Princess of the Franks, was born c. 375 in France; the daughter of Lord Genebald of The East Franks and (Genobaud). Historically, she was a princess of the Sicambrian Franks, who married well. Her lineage added a whole new strain of royal blood to the Fisher King, dually Desposyni blood line. Little is known about her personally… e.g., her tastes in clothes, preferences in observing jousts, battles, and/or tortures, and the extent of her searching for her inner child. She did, however, have several outer childs. These included, according to Laurence Gardner [Bloodline of the Holy Grail] Clodion, Lord of Tournai, Fredemundus, Sire of the Franks, and Frotmund, the proverbial younger brother who appears to have no clever title following the comma behind his name. Meanwhile, Ancestry.com suggests that Clodion’s younger and only brother was Duke Adelbertus of Moselle.
Fortunately, Argotta’s heritage is reasonably well known, i.e., the Sicambrian Franks. According to Laurence Gardner [The Magdalene Legacy (page 215) and Bloodline of the Holy Grail (page 164)]:
“The Sicambrians from whose female line Meroveus emerged, were previously associated with Grecian Arcadia, originating before that in Scythia by the Black Sea. They took their name from Cambra, a tribal queen of about 380 BCE, and were called the people of the Newmage (the New Covenant), precisely as the Essenes of Qumrun had once been known. In view of their Arcadian heritage, the fish symbolism of the Bistea Neptunis was part of their tradition even before their association with the Fisher Kings in Gaul. Their navigational culture had been closely linked to Pallas, the Arcadian sea-lord, and variations of his name (such as King Pelles) were brought back into play in later Arthurian times.
The Sicambrian Franks begin with Antenor (d. 443 BCE), King of the Cimmerians of Scythia on the Black Sea and a descendant of the Trojan Royal House (Troy). The generations of his descendants — the generations from Antenor [1] being numbered in brackets — then interacted in definitive ways and reconnected to the other lines of descent. For example, his son, Marcomer [2] (d. 412 BCE) moved the Cimmerians from the Black Sea to West-Friezland, Gelders and Holland, crossed the Rhine and conquered Northern Gaul. Priamus [4] (d. 358 BCE) introduced the New Covenant and the Saxon language. Diocles [6] (d. 300 BCE) aided Saxons against the Goths and Southern Gauls, as did his grandson, Clodomir [8] (d. 232 BCE). Marcomer [10] (d. 170 BCE) defeated Romans, Gauls and Goths, while his son, Clodius [11] (d. 159 BCE) withstood further invasions by Romans and Gauls. Merovachus [14] led an army of 22,000 against Roman centers in Italy, and overthrew Bohemia. Antharius [16] (d. 39 BCE) withstood invasions by Julius Caesar. His son, Francus [17] (d.11 BCE) changed the tribal name from Sicambri to Franks! Clodomir [20] (d. CE 63) drove Nero’s legions out of Metz and Trier. Marcomer [25] (d. CE 169) married Athildis of Camulod – elder sister of British King Lleiffer Mawr (King Lucius).
[Lucius’ younger daughter, Eurgen, married Aminadab. Descendants from Lucius’s third daughter, Gladys, included Aedan Mac Gabran (Pendragon), the father of King Arthur.]
“The Sicambrian line of ‘Franks’ — ultimately from whom France acquired its name — were themselves first so called after their chief Francio (a descendant of Noah) who died in 11 BCE. Prior to their Scythian days, Francio’s race originated in ancient Troy (in what is now north-western Turkey), after which the French city of Troyes was named. The city of Paris (established by 6th-century Merovingians) likewise bears the name of Prince Paris (the son of King Priam of Troy) whose liaison with Helen of Sparta caused the Trojan War.”
This is just one more example, where each of the royal folk who pop up in order to marry into the mainstream Jesus line, are themselves descended from various members of the mainstream ancestors… even if there is sometimes less documentation to prove anything conclusively. Suffice it to say that the royal folk have spent about five thousand years perfecting the begat and succession bit, and have in fact become quite adept at it. They often know with a degree of certainty whose child is whose… which so often becomes vitally important… for some reason.
This now brings us up to the latest major recombining of royal lines, in this case the Kings of Troy with the Fisher Kings (who include a descent from Troy in their lineage as well… albeit via Rome, Claudius, et al). Specifically this involves Argotta, Princess of the Franks from the line of Dagobert, marrying the latest Fisher King, Faramund, who was to become Lord of the West Franks. As previously mentioned, it’s all too often a matter of marrying just the right woman, if you’re hoping to be treated like a king.
Argotta, meanwhile has managed to create — with the not insignificant assistance of her husband, Faramund — three rather interesting lines of descent, which are included in Figure 3. The fourth line of descent, via Duke Adelbertus of Moselle, tends to go nowhere… other than his being born c. 405 in Westphalia, Germany, and subsequently dying in 491. It might not sound like all that much, but living for 86 years in the fifth century was a notable achievement… assuming of course that he’s real.
Figure 3. Descendants of Franks and Britain

Queen Argotta Cimbri “Rosamunde” of the Franks aka av Friesland, de Thuringia
Born about 0376 in Sicambria, France
Daughter of Genebald of East Franks II and Amalagerge d’ Ostrogothe
Sister of Argotta Franks, Argotta Franks, Argotta Franks, Queen Argotta of the Franks and Argotta Franks

The Cimbri were a Germanic tribe,[1] who together with the Teutones and the Ambrones fought the Roman Republic between 113 and 101 BC. The Cimbri were initially successful, particularly at the Battle of Arausio, in which up to 120,000 Roman soldiers were killed, after which they raided large areas in Gaul and Hispania. In 101 BC, during an attempted invasion of Italy, the Cimbri were decisively defeated by Gaius Marius, and their King Boiorix was killed. Some of the surviving captives are reported to have been among the rebeling Gladiators in the Third Servile War.[2] A contemperorary Germanic community in Northern Italy who speak the Cimbrian language, is also known as the Cimbri.

Strabo gives this vivid description of the Cimbric folklore (Geogr. 7.2.3, trans. H.L. Jones):
Their wives, who would accompany them on their expeditions, were attended by priestesses who were seers; these were grey-haired, clad in white, with flaxen cloaks fastened on with clasps, girt with girdles of bronze, and bare-footed; now sword in hand these priestesses would meet with the prisoners of war throughout the camp, and having first crowned them with wreaths would lead them to a brazen vessel of about twenty amphorae; and they had a raised platform which the priestess would mount, and then, bending over the kettle, would cut the throat of each prisoner after he had been lifted up; and from the blood that poured forth into the vessel some of the priestesses would draw a prophecy, while still others would split open the body and from an inspection of the entrails would utter a prophecy of victory for their own people; and during the battles they would beat on the hides that were stretched over the wicker-bodies of the wagons and in this way produce an unearthly noise.
The Cimbri are depicted as ferocious warriors who did not fear death. The host was followed by women and children on carts. Aged women, priestesses, dressed in white sacrificed the prisoners of war and sprinkled their blood, the nature of which allowed them to see what was to come.
If the Cimbri did in fact come from Jutland, evidence that the they practised ritualistic sacrifice may be found in the Haraldskær Woman discovered in Jutland in the year 1835. Noosemarks and skin piercing were evident and she had been thrown into a bog rather than buried or cremated. Furthermore, the Gundestrup cauldron, found in Himmerland, may be a sacrificial vessel like the one described in Strabo’s text. The work itself was of Thracian origin.

The known Cimbri chiefs have names that look Celtic, including Boiorix (which may mean “King of the Boii” or, more literally, “King of Strikers”), Gaesorix (which means “Spear King”), and Lugius (which may be named after the Celtic god Lugus), although this may not mean that they are Celtic as the elements could work in Germanic (compare the name of the Vandalic king Gaiseric, which is likely identical to Gaesorix).[25] Also, although the kings of the Cimbri and Teutones carry what look like Celtic names, the origin of a name need not say anything about the ethnicity or language of the individual carrying the name. Other evidence to the language of the Cimbri is circumstantial: thus, we are told that the Romans enlisted Gaulish Celts to act as spies in the Cimbri camp prior to the final showdown with the Roman army in 101 BC. Some take this as evidence in support of “the Celtic rather than the German theory”.[26]
Jean Markale[27] wrote that the Cimbri were associated with the Helvetii, and more especially with the indisputably Celtic Tigurini. These associations may link to a common ancestry, recalled from two hundred years previous, though they may not. Henri Hubert[28] states “All these names are Celtic, and they cannot be anything else”. Some authors take a different perspective.[29]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Arausio

The Battle of Arausio took place on October 6, 105 BC, at a site between the town of Arausio (modern day Orange, Vaucluse) and the Rhône River. Ranged against the migratory tribes of the Cimbri under Boiorix and the Teutoni were two Roman armies, commanded by the proconsul Quintus Servilius Caepio and consul Gnaeus Mallius Maximus. However, bitter differences between the commanders prevented the Roman armies from cooperating, with devastating results. The terrible defeat gave Gaius Marius the opportunity to come to the fore and radically reform the organization and recruitment of Roman legions. Roman losses are described as being up to 80,000 troops, as well as another 40,000 auxiliary troops (allies), servants and camp followers — virtually all of their participants in the battle. In numbers killed, this battle is regarded as the greatest defeat of Rome ever throughout its ancient history.

The Bar Kokhba revolt (132–136 CE),[2] Hebrew: מרד בר כוכבא or mered bar kokhba, was the third major rebellion by the Jews of Judaea Province against the Roman Empire and the last of the Jewish-Roman Wars. Simon bar Kokhba, the commander of the revolt, was acclaimed as a Messiah, a heroic figure who could restore Israel. The revolt established an independent state of Israel over parts of Judea for over two years, but a Roman army made up of six full legions with auxiliaries and elements from up to six additional legions finally crushed it.[3] The Romans then barred Jews from Jerusalem, except to attend Tisha B’Av. Although Jewish Christians hailed Jesus as the Messiah and did not support Bar Kokhba,[4] they were barred from Jerusalem along with the rest of the Jews.[citation needed] The war and its aftermath helped differentiate Christianity as a religion distinct from Judaism (see also List of events in early Christianity).[citation needed] The rebellion is also known as The Third Jewish-Roman War or The Third Jewish Revolt, though some historians relate it as Second Jewish Revolt, not counting the Kitos War, 115–117 CE.[citation needed]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bar_Kokhba_revolt

The Kitos War (115–117) (Hebrew: מרד הגלויות: mered ha’galuyot or mered ha’tfutzot (מרד התפוצות), translation: Rebellion of the exile) is the name given to the second of the Jewish–Roman wars. Major revolts by diasporic Jews in Cyrene (Cyrenaica), Cyprus, Mesopotamia and Aegyptus spiraled out of control, resulting in a widespread slaughter of Roman citizens and others (200,000 in Cyrene, 240,000 in Cyprus according to Cassius Dio, but see below) by the Jewish rebels. The rebellions were finally crushed by Roman legionary forces, chiefly by the Roman general Lusius Quietus, whose nomen later gave the conflict its title, as “Kitos” is a later corruption of Quietus.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitos_War

n 115, the emperor Trajan was in command of the eastern campaign against the Parthian Empire. The Roman invasion had been prompted by the imposition of a pro-Parthian king on the throne of Armenia after a Parthian invasion of that land. This encroachment on the traditional sphere of influence of the Roman Empire — the two empires had shared hegemony over Armenia since the time of Nero some 50 years earlier — could only lead to war.
As Trajan’s army advanced victoriously through Mesopotamia, Jewish rebels in its rear began attacking the small garrisons left behind. A revolt in far off Cyrenaica soon spread to Egypt and then Cyprus, inciting revolt in Judaea. A widespread uprising centered at Lydda threatened grain supplies from Egypt to the front. The Jewish insurrection swiftly spread to the recently conquered provinces. Cities with substantial Jewish populations – Nisibis, Edessa, Seleucia, Arbela – joined the rebellion and slaughtered their small Roman garrisons.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hwbradley/aqwg914.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s076/f002615.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s096/f035024.htm

,http://fabpedigree.com/s004/f579799.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s036/f836959.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s040/f836959.htm

– Wisimar (12th King) of the HERULI   +
====> [ 33]

/
– Mizislaus I (13th King) of the HERULI

/  
\
– Amalasunta

/
– Rodagasus (14th King) of the HERULI  (340? – 405?)

/  
\
– Belga

/
– Godigiselus (King) of the VANDALS  (? – 406)



/
– poss. not  (NN) … (NN) of VANDALS   +
====> [ 218 ,,q,&]



/  

| ( very many missing generations)

/  
\
– Cella (Cecilia) of the VANDALS
/
– Gaiseric (King) of the VANDALS


| OR: prob. not Gaiseric of the VANDALS [alt ped]   +
====> [ 38]
/  
\
– poss.  Frilla (Elisa; Flora)
- Hunneric (King) of the VANDALS (in Africa)

/
– Flavius HONORIUS Theodosius   +
====> [ 218 ,,x,&]

/
– Theodosius I `the Elder’ (EMPEROR) of the EAST

/  
\
– Thermantia (Thermentia Thermanis)

/
– Arcadius (EMPEROR) of the EAST  (377? – 408)


\
– Aelia Flavia FLACCILLA  (Spain ? – 386)

/  

| OR: Galla VALENTINIANA   +
====> [ 219 ,,qY,&]

/
– Theodosius (Theodorius) II (EMPEROR) of the EAST



/
– Bauton of the FRANKS


\
– Aelia Eudoxia of the FRANKS  (380? – 404)

/  

\
– poss.  daughter of Mallobaudes   +
====> [ 218 ,,q,&]
\
– poss.  Eudoxia LUCINIA  (422? – ?)


| or: poss. (NN), mistress


/
– Leontius of KONSTANTINOPEL

\
– Athenais (Aelia) Eudocia  (401? – 460)

http://fabpedigree.com/s052/f782699.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s008/f012542.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s080/f415168.htm

– Bedwig (of SCEAF)   +
====> [ 76 ,,y]

/  

| OR: Magog   +
====> [ 13]

/
– Hwala (Hvala Hawala Guala)

/
– Hathra (Athra)

/
– Itermon (Itormann)

/
– Heremod (King) in DENMARK

/
– Sceldwa (King) in DENMARK

/
– Beaw (Gram) (King) in DENMARK

/
– Taetwa (Tatwa Tecti)

| or: poss. Taetwa (Taetwa’s son)

/  

| OR: Filogud of the GOTHS   +
====> [ 82 ,,y]

/
– Jat (Geatwa Geata Geat Gaut Geot Gauti)

/  

| OR: poss. not Gothus, eponym of GOTHS   +
====> [ 91 ,,y]

/
– Godwulf (Gudolfr)

/
– Flocwald (of ASGARD ?)

/  

| (skip this generation?)

/
– Finn (the TROJAN ?)  (Asgard 130? – ?)
/
– Frithuwulf (the TROJAN ?)
/  

| (skip this generation?)
- Frealaf (Friallaf Froethelaf)

Laomedan of TROY   +
====> [ 65 ,,Y]

/  

| or: prob. not Priam (q.v. : Laomedan’s son)

/
– Tithonius of TROY


\
– prob.  Strymo of TROY   +
====> [ 9]

| or: Leucippe

/  

| OR: Placia of TROY   +
====> [ 2]

/
– Memnon (Munon) of TROY


\
– Eos the TITAN   +
====> [ 12]

/  

| OR: source: Hausos   +
====> [ 2]

/
– Thor (Tror) (King) of THRACE



| or: Vingehar (Thor’s son)

/  
\
– Troana Iluim of TROY   +
====> [ 67 ,,Y]

/
– Loridi (Hloritha) TRORSSON

/  
\
– Sibil (Sif)

/
– Einridi LORIDESSON

/
– Vingethor (Vingethior) EINRIDISSON

/
– Vingener VINGETHORSSON

/
– Moda (Mode) VINGENERSSON

/
– Maji (Magi) MODASSON
/
– Seskef (Sceaf Scaef)

| OR: Shem (Sceaf Sam Sem) ibn NOAH   +
====> [ 12]
/  

| or: Japhet (Shem’s brother)
- Bedwig (Bedvig; of SCEAF)

Laomedan (King) of TROY

     (Lamidon Laomedon)
     Born:   ?   Died:  abt. 1237 BC

Poss. Jullus of Rome’s Great-Great-Grandfather.       HM George I’s 85-Great Grandfather.       HRE Ferdinand I’s 81-Great Grandfather.       `Osawatomie’ Brown’s 91-Great Grandfather.
“People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors.”

 poss. Wives/Partners:       Strymo of TROY   ;   Leucippe   ;   Placia of TROY
 Children:       Priam Podarces (High King) of TROY   ;   Hesione (q.v.)

 Possible Child:       Tithonius of TROY
 Alternative Father of Possible Child:       prob. not Priam (q.v. : Laomedan’s son)

________
________
________
________
_______
_______
_______
_______
______
_____
_____
 

/
– Zerah (Zehrah Zarah Zare) ibn JUDAH   +
====> [ 31 ,,Y]

| OR: Javan   +
====> [ 13]

/  

| or: Zeus the OLYMPIAN, q.v.

/
– Dardanus (Dara) (King) of ACADIA



| OR: Dardan (Darius) in Norse genealogies   +
====> [ 19]



| OR: Dardanus [alt ped]   +
====> [ 29]

/  
\
– Electra the PLEIADE   +
====> [ 8]

/
– Erichthonius (King) of ACADIA  (? – 1386? BC)

/  
\
– Batea of TEUCRI   +
====> [ 8]

/
– Trois of ACADIA  (1337? BC – 1330? BC)

/  
\
– Astyoche of ACADIA   +
====> [ 17]
/
– Ilus (Ilyus) (King) of TROY  (? – 1282? BC)


/
– Scamander `Xantus’ TEUCRI   +
====> [ 6]


/  

| OR: Scamander   +
====> [ 34 ,,y]

\
– Callirhoe (TEUCRI)
/  

\
– poss.  Idaea
- Laomedan (King) of TROY

/
– poss.  Talaus (King) of ARGOS   +
====> [ 53 ,,y]

/
– poss.  Adrastus (King) of ARGOS & SICYON



| or: Adrastus of TROY


\
– poss.  Lysianassa of SICYON   +
====> [ 44]

/  

| or: Lysimache, q.v.
\
– Eurydice (Eurydike) of TROY


/
– Pronax of ARGOS   +
====> [ 62 ,,y]


/  

| (skip this generation?)

http://fabpedigree.com/s008/f012542.htm

\
– poss.  Amphithea of ARGOS

Elohim, GOD of Israel

     aka Yahweh, GOD of Judah; aka Jehovah, GOD of the Christians; poss. aka Semahl, GOD of Assyria; poss. aka Yeadara, GOD of the Qemant; `Elohim’ prob. means `the Powerful Ones’, with `Yahweh’ (`He who is’) being Elohim’s monotheistic incarnation.

Poss. Jullus of Rome’s 14-Great Grandfather.       HM George I’s 91-Great Grandfather.       HRE Ferdinand I’s 87-Great Grandfather.       Agnes Harris’s 91-Great Grandfather.
The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.

 Wives/Partners:       Mary `Holy Mother’ (of SEPPHORIS)   ;   Lilake the (Sumerian) DEMONESS   ;   Mother of first mortal   ;   Hebat, the (Hittite) GODDESS   ;   (in some ancient traditions) an Asherah (Lilith (q.v.) ?)
 Children:       Samael (Sammael) the DEMON   ;   Lilith the DEMONESS   ;   Adam, the First Man   ;   Eve, the First Woman

 Possible Child:       Yeshu (ben PANTERA ?) ha-NOTZRI
 Alternative Fathers of Possible Child:       poss. Joseph ben JACOB   ;   Father in the Holy Trinity   ;   source: Adapa (King) of ERIDU

________
________
________
________
_______
_______
_______
_______
______
_____
_____
 

/
– Lahmu, the Primordial GOD   +
====> [ 2]

/
– Anshar, the Primordial GOD

/  
\
– Lahamu, the Primordial GODDESS   +
====> [ 2]

/
– Anu, GOD of the Sky



| (skip this generation?)



/
– Lahmu, the Primordial GOD   +
====> [ 2]


\
– Kishar, the Primordial GODDESS

/  

\
– Lahamu, the Primordial GODDESS   +
====> [ 2]

/
– source:  Enlil, GOD of Wind


/
– Lahmu, the Primordial GOD   +
====> [ 2]



/
– Anshar, the Primordial GOD



/  
\
– Lahamu, the Primordial GODDESS   +
====> [ 2]


\
– Ki, GODDESS of the Earth   (skip?)


/
– Lahmu, the Primordial GOD   +
====> [ 2]

\
– Kishar, the Primordial GODDESS

/  

\
– Lahamu, the Primordial GODDESS   +
====> [ 2]
/
– source:  El, Supreme GOD of CANAAN
/  

- Elohim, GOD of Israel

\
– Atiratu, Semitic GODDESS of Fertility

Huneric or Honeric (slavicized name Uniemirek) (died December 23, 484) was King of the Vandals (477–484) and the oldest son of Genseric. He dropped the imperial politics of his father and concentrated mainly on internal affairs. He was married to Eudocia, daughter of western Roman Emperor Valentinian III (419–455) and Licinia Eudoxia. She left him, probably in 472. She had one son by him, Hilderic.
Huneric was the first Vandal king who used the title King of the Vandals and Alans. Despite adopting this style, and that the Vandals maintained their sea-power and their hold on the islands of the western Mediterranean Sea, Huneric did not have the prestige that his father Genseric had enjoyed with other states.

Faramund (Lord Pharamond of the West Franks) (CE 419-430), is an early king of the Franks first referred to in the anonymous 8th century Carolingian text Liber Historiae Francorum, wherein the anonymous author begins by writing of the Trojan origin for the Franks.
[Besides being in the Trojan royal line, the Carolingians are due for a prominent place in the annals of history... and thus should be given their due even now in the course of this MOAFT.]
married Princess Argotta, a descendant of the Sicambrian Franks
Children:
Clodion of Tournai, King of the Salian Franks, King Clodion le Chevelu, of Tournai
Frotmund (according to Gardner)
Fredemundus, Sire of the Franks (according to Gardner)
Duke Adelbertus of Moselle (according to Ancestry.com)

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I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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